Training Champions:

Preparing to perform up to our potential (the 3 P’s of success) is always our goal in training. A runner or team may or may not win a medal or trophy as a result of this, but that doesn’t make them any less of a champion if they’ve done everything they can to be the best runner and the best teammate they can be which is reflected in the following passage from the great coach John Wooden:

A coach can only do his best, nothing more, but he does owe that, not only to himself, but to the people who employ him and to the youngsters under his supervision.  If you truly do your best, and only you will really know, then you are successful and the actual score is immaterial whether it was favorable or unfavorable.  However, when you fail to do your best, you have failed, even though the score might have been to your liking.

This does not mean that you should not coach to win.  You must teach your players to play to win and do everything in their power that is ethical and honest to win.  I do not want players who do not have a keen desire to win and to play aggressively to accomplish that objective.  However, I want to be able to feel and want my players to sincerely feel that doing the best that you are capable of doing is victory in itself and less than that is defeat.

It is altogether possible that whatever success I have had or may have could be in direct proportion to my ability not only to instill that idea in my players, but also to live up to it myself.

Therefore, I continually stress to my players that all I expect from them at practice and in the games is their best effort.  They must be eager to become the best they are capable of becoming.  I tell them that although I want them to be pleased over victory and individual accomplishment, I want them to get the most satisfaction from knowing that both they and the team did their best.  I hope their actions or conduct following a game will not indicate victory or defeat.  Heads should always be high when you have done your best regardless of the score and there is no reason for being overly jubilant at victory or unduly depressed by defeat.

Furthermore, I am rather thoroughly convinced that those who have the self-satisfaction of knowing they have done their best will also be on the most desirable end of the score much, and perhaps more, than their natural ability might indicate.

While that sense of self-satisfaction from knowing you’ve done your best is the ultimate prize, we do also believe that it’s important to recognize our “training champions” and hold them up as an example for others to follow.

400/500 Mile Clubs:

The 400/500 Mile Clubs began the summer of 2006 as an incentive for being committed to getting in the summer mileage necessary to be prepared for the fall XC season.  Girls must run 400 and boys run 500 miles over the summer, between June 1st and the morning of Time Trials, to make it in to the club.  Those who accomplish this feat receive our version of cycling’s yellow jersey – a gold shirt with the club logo on the front and the following motto on the back:

“Only those who risk going too far 
can find out how far they can go.”  
– T.S. Eliot

2007

Stephanie Ladd

Bill Martin

Chris Duderstadt

2008

Megan Frohardt

Megan Haghnegahdar

Sarah Mulholland

Chris Duderstadt

Kirk Bodendistel

Megan Frohardt

2009

Megan Haghnegahdar

Molly Smith

Garrett McPherson

2010

Megan Haghnegahdar

Molly Smith

Alli Cash

Caitlin Hooper

Morgan Clay

Evan Williams

2011

Molly Smith

Alli Cash

Emily Herbers

Ryan Cooney

Jonah Heng

2012

Alli Cash

Emily Herbers

Jillian Benson

Bailey Stewart

Hui Feng

Brett Neely

Ryan Fajardo

J Geracie

Tyler Shuck

Jacob Thomas

Ryan Cooney

Mitchell Kelly

2013

Reilly Wiscombe

Jacob Thomas

Peter Dring

Bailey Stewart

Margaret Leligdon

2014

Jagjeet Malhi

Avery Hoffpauir

2015

Alyssa Marksz

James LaPorta

2016

Alyssa Marksz

2017

Ryan Troy

2018

Ryan Troy

2019

Jaden Mellinger

2020

Who is next?

PaceSetter Award:

While the 400/500 Mile Club is given individuals who have worked hard to be the best they can be, the Pacesetter Award Character is about recognizing those who have gone the extra mile and not only elevated their own performance, but that of their teammates. The word “PACE” is an acronym we use to help remind us of the essentials of character that contribute to our success.

P = Potential + Preparation + Performance

ACE = Attitude + Commitment + Effort

Recognizing that attitude, commitment and effort as well as how you prepare are choices, and  beyond that, choices which are contagious, a PaceSetter is a team member who has embodied these values, has positively impacted those around them and the culture of our team. In doing so they have left a legacy behind that will be felt long after they graduate.

“What we do for ourselves dies with us.
What we do for others is eternal.”

2010

Claire Boyts

Megan Frohardt

Megan Hagnegahdar

Evan Williams

2011

Jillian Benson

Alli Cash

Brandon Keller

Jeb Stewart

2012

Sarah Hinman

Jess Hole

Ashton Tevault

Ryan Cooney

Jacob Thomas

Becca Geracie

2013

Margaret Leligdon

2014

Erika Smith

Riley Kaiser

2016 

Diane Troy

2017

Stephanie Marksz

Grant Kimerer

Mia Wilhoit

Dara Williams

2018

Logan Klingele

Erin Bender

2019

Lucas Dawson

Jed Taylor

Emma Vielhauer

Amelia Hart

2020

Who will be next?

*Recipeints are selected by the coaches from those nominated by their peers.